October 31, 2014, 12:00:45 pm

Author Topic: Medinical Ethnobotanicals  (Read 8920 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Teotzlcoatl

  • Kie Ti' Koal
  • Forum Spammer
  • Posts: 717
    • Join the Peyote Way Church!
Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« on: September 23, 2008, 09:11:07 am »
Cold meds-

Pill/Syrup (Morning)-

Ephedra

Kratom (small amount)

Urtica dioica [ Stinging Nettle ]

Coca (cocaine)

Cacao (chocolate)




Pill/Syrup (Evening)-

Kratom

"Opium Lettuce" ~ Lactuca Virosa

"Myrrh" ~ Commiphora myrrha

Hops





Cough drop-

"Osha/Oshala" ~ Ligusticum grayi & porteri

"Toothache Plant" ~ Spilanthes Acmella

"Vanilla" ~ Vanilla planifolia

"Peppermint" ~ Mentha piperita

"Wild Mint" ~ Mentha arvensis

"Lemon Balm" ~ Melissa officinalis

"Spearmint" ~ Mentha spicata

"Eucalyptus" ~ Eucalyptus dives, globulus & polybractea

"Clove" ~ Syzygium aromaticum

"Marshmallow" ~ Althea officinalis

"Honeysuckle" ~ Lonicera japonica

"Wintergreen" ~ Gaultheria procumbens

"Ginger" ~ Zingiber officinale

"Ironwort" ~ Sideritis syriaca

"Horehound" ~ Marrubium vulgare

"Sage" ~ Salvia officinalis

"Thyme" ~ Thymus vulgaris

"Stevia" ~ Stevia rebaudiana

Cane Sugar

Honey



(Should not be taken by pregnant women)



Throat Spray-

Rosemary

Orange extract/oil

neem extract Melia azadirachta (Neem)

Garlic

white willow bark

Slippery Elm

Lungwort



Cats Claw

Wild cherry bark

licorice



elderberries

kratom

glaucine or yellow horned poppy

nigella sativa oil

Poppy pods

Cacao

dandelion

Echinacea

Mullein

"Salvia" ~ Salvia nemorosa; spathacea; species



Nigella sativa


Corydalis species


Pedicularis species

"Pepper"

"Holy Basil" ~ Ocimum sanctum




« Last Edit: February 02, 2009, 05:03:00 pm by Teotzlcoatl »
WARNING: DO NOT INGEST ANY BOTANICAL WHICH YOU HAVE NOT FULLY RESEARCHED AND CORRECTLY IDENTIFIED!!!


 Teotzlcoatl and all of her incarnations and their activities are projections of a conscious being's intent trasmitted into a pseudo-physical form in between this realm and the next. All posts are fictional, and so is everything esle.


"We Are The One's We've Been Waiting For" - Hopi Proverb

Offline tryl

  • Untermensch
  • Ultracontributor
  • Posts: 4581
  • carpe noctem.
    • n/a
Re: Pain-Killing Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2008, 09:17:47 am »
Papaver somniferum.

the little demons...

cannabis is a wonderful painkiller too, but it doesn't bring that comfortable state of mind that opioid receptor agonists do. :)

his pants will be crusted with semen from constantly jerking off whenever he can't find a rape victim.

in the words of archimedes - give me a lever and a place to put it... or i shall kill a hostage every hour.

Offline psilocyborg

  • feeling machine
  • Uberator
  • Penultimate Contributor
  • Posts: 7323
  • state of the heart
Re: Pain-Killing Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2008, 09:25:49 am »
cocaine is an effective local anesthetic.

Offline DayLight

  • Super Contributor
  • Posts: 293
  • shes a drug addict aged five
Re: Pain-Killing Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2008, 09:47:18 am »
Salvia spp. - nemorosa and spathacea for sure...I have even heard reports of pain being lessened after a trip with divinorum.

cannabis sativa and indica(moreso indica but both are wonderful)

nigella sativa

kava kava

corydalis spp.

and frankly the most pain killing effects ive ever had from a plant came from psilocybe mushrooms. i was tripping hard and literally dug a giant splinter in my foot out with my fingernails. grotesque shit, actually digging into my foot...i didnt feel a fuckin thing
Then we rested in a desert
Where the bones were white as teeth sir
And we saw st elmo's fire
Splitting ions in the ether                                                                                                                                                      -Brian Eno

Offline Papyrifera

  • Loved by All
  • Uberstrator
  • Ultracontributor
  • Posts: 4608
  • Vis Mediatriz, Yo!
Pain-Killing ethnobotanicals, A to I
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2008, 09:53:06 am »
Achillea species (Asteraceae/Compositae) (Yarrow) – Achillea is a genus of perennial species native to both Eurasia and North America. Achillea millefolium is a common garden plant with finely divided, bitter tasting leaves is well known in both European and native North American herbal medicine. The name “Achillea” comes from the Greek Achilles, and may refer to the use of the plant by the ancient Greeks for its analgesic effects. Yarrow contains several volatile compounds, including pinene and terpinolene which are found in Pinaceae species, as well as various non-volatile compounds in both leaf and flower that combined exert analgesic, sedative, antipyretic, antimicrobial and narcotic effects. Large amounts may be toxic due to prusanine, thujone and other constituents, and flowers are generally more toxic than leaves. Smoking the leaves is said to potentiate the effects of Cannabis. Contains the anti-allergenic, immunostimulant, antimicrobial and mildy narcotic compoound matricine, the stimulant, narcotic and antimicrobial compound thujone, the anticancer and immunostimulant compound inuline, tannins, flavonoids, coumarins, saponins, sedative dehydro-matricaria-esters, and prusanine, a toxic cyanogenic heteroside which has heart depressing effects and can be poisonous in large amounts. Yarrow also contains the alkaloids achiline, stachydrine and marrubine.

Achyrocline satureoides (Asteraceae/Compositae) (Macela) – This aromatic annual native to tropical South America is used in native herbal medicine for its immunostimulant, antimicrobial, analgesic, antioxidant, antispasmodic, mild sedative and muscle relaxant effects. Also useful for regulating blood sugar and heart rate. Contains numerous novel flavonoids as well as terpenes. Caffeic acid, caryophyllene (antispasmodic), chlorogenic acid (stimulant), cineol, ocimene, pinene, galangin, and quercetin (anticancerous) are also present.

Agastache rugosa; mexicana; foeniculum; spp (Labiatae/Lamiaceae) (Anise hyssop) – This genus of aromatic plants in the mint family contain many volatile essential oils and have traditionally been used as sedatives, cough suppressants, anti-inflammatory, relaxant and analgesics. Also held to have anti-anxiety effects. Agastache rugosa was found to contain 32 volatile oils, mainly methylcavicol, but also  limonene, caryophyllene, linoleic acid and other terpenes. Agastache mexicana and A. foeniculum have also been noted as having anxiolytic properties.

Alchornea castaneifolia (Euphorbiaceae) (Iporuru) – This shrubby tree from the amazon is used as an analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and aphrodisiac substance. Used by Amazonian shamans and sometimes included in ayahuasca brews. Contains alchorneine and other alkaloids, phenols, flavonols and flavones, tannins, xanthones, saponins and plant steroids.

Alnus species (Betulaceae) (Alder) – Inner bark of alder trees was reputedly smoked by natives in British Columbia for a psychoactive effect. Contains methyl-salicyclate and other compounds related to aspirin that have analgesic and antipyretic effects.

Aloysia triphylla (Verbenaceae) (Lemon Verbena) – This aromatic plant native to South America has a strong lemon scent and is used medicinally as an analgesic, mild sedative, antispasmodic and anti-inflammatory as well as having antimicrobial effects. Contains large amounts of caryophyllene, limonene and other common plant terpenes.

Aralia nudicalis; racemosa; spinosa (Araliaceae) (Spikenard) – Spikenard is an aromatic perennial shrub native to North America. It is used as an a tonic, adaptogen, analgesic, antitussive, stimulant and perspiration inducer. Also used as a flavouring in some root beers. Aralia rhizome has been chewed or made into tea to treat heart pain, cough, sore throat and as a tonic to treat various diseases by Native Americans. Roots harvested in the fall are held to be the most potent. Aralia nudicalis has been found to contain the triterpenes alpha and beta-amyrin, ubiquitous plant sterols, and also tested positive for alkaloids. Triterpene saponins have been isolated from other species of Aralia.

Arnica montana/spp (Compositae) (Leopard’s-bane) – This perennial plant with large, daisy like flowers is often cultivated in rock gardens, and the root is used externally in salves or extracts as a strong analgesic and anti-inflammatory herb. Taken internally Arnica is poisonous, causing dangerous rises in blood pressure and toxic effects to the heart, stomach and intestines. Arnica angustifolia, A. cordifolia, A. diversifolia and A. fulgens are listed as having nervine effects.

Asarum species (Wild Ginger) (Aristolochiaceae) – Asarum seiboldii root is used as an analgesic and anti-inflammatory in Korean medicine. Asarum has been shown to have opioid-mediated analgesic activity, as well as sedative and significant anti-inflamatory effects. Contains volatile essential oils including asarone that are related in structure to psychedelic phenethylamines. Asarum is considered to be somewhat toxic, and asarone is listed as a carcinogen. Asarum canadense and A. europaeum are listed as stimulants, and also contain volatile oils in their roots.

Azadirachta indica
(Neem) (Meliaceae) – Neem essential oil has been shown to have strong insecticidal, insect repellant, and antibacterial action, as well as exhibiting anxiolytic effects similar to diazepam and analgesic effects  moderated through both opioid and non-opioid receptor systems. Neem oil contains a variety of terpenoids including azadiractin, azadirone, epoxyaxadiradione, nimbin, gedunin, azadiradione, deacetylnimbin, 17-hydroxyazadiradione and mahmoodin, which have antibacterial and insecticidal action. Also contains the terpenes cardinene, copaene and humulene, the antibacterial hydrocarbons icosane, docosane, 2-methyltricosane and docosene, and a variety of fatty acids.

Bacopa monniera (Scrophulariaceae) (Brahmi) – Bacops is a small blue-flowered plant used in Ayurvedic medicine as an adaptogen and memory enhancer. Has been sold as a product to increase learning and memory, decrease stress, as a nervine, antidepressant, antioxidant, anticonvulsant, sedative, antimicrobial and analgesic. Contains a variety of alkaloids and glycosides, including small amounts of nicotine and luteolin, as well as the saponins Bacoside A and Bacoside B which have been shown to enhance nerve impulse transmission and may be responsible for many of the adaptogenic effects. Other species of Bacopa are cultivated as garden plants.

Betula lenta (Betulaceae) (Sweet birch) – Young twigs and branches of this species of birch tree contain a volatile essential oil that is about 98% salicyclic acid. Used as a substitute for wintergreen oil, which has nearly an identical composition. Has effective analgesic and antipyretic effects similar to aspirin, and has been used as a flavouring and a stimulant. The birch species Betula glandulosa, B. kenaira, B. nana and B occidentalis are listed as having sedative effects.

Brunfelsia species (Solonaceae) (Manaca)– This genus of solonaceous South American shrubs contains a variety of active alkaloids, including manaceine, manacine, scopoletin, aesculetin, as well as a variety of volatile essential oil components. They are traditionally used as sedatives, analgesics and hallucinogens in South America. Brunfelsia uniflora is a shrub native to the Amazon and West Indies whose root is used as an ayahuasca admix and has analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, central nervous system depressant, sedative and laxative effects. Brunfelsia chiricaspi and Brunfelsia grandiflora are used by rainforest indians as hallucinogens and ayahuasca admixes. The name chiricaspi is derived from the local name and means “tree of chills”. These two species have toxic effects and are thought to contain tropane alkaloids related to those in Brugmansia.

Capsicum species (Solonaceae) (Chile pepper) – Capsicum frutescens and other species of capsicum are native to Central and South America and Zanzibar. The fruits are used as a food and as a spice for “hot” chile pepper varieties. Hot chile peppers contain the compound capsaicin which irritates mucosal membrane receptors. This results in a false pain signal coming from these mucosal membranes (no damage actually occurs), and the body responds by increasing the release of endorphins which block the pain signals at opiate receptors. Capsaicin also directly interacts with the vanillin receptor complex which mediates pain signals and is closely linked with opiate receptors. This combination of actions results in the strong analgesic and slight euphoriant effects of hot chile peppers. Capsaicin also induces perspiration and is a stimulant. The chile pepper fruit has also be found to contain the chemicals 1,8-cineole, camphor, carvone, chlorogenic acid and scopoletin, all of which are considered CNS-stimulants, and thujone, which is considered a narcotic, stimulant and hallucinogenic.

Carapa guianensis; procera (Meliaceae) (Andiroba) – This large rainforest tree in the mahogony family produces a brown, woody, four-corned nut resembling a chestnut that is 63% oil. The Munduruku indians use this oil to mummify human heads taken as war trophies. The seed oil aso has analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antipyretic effects. Andiroba oil is high in essential fatty acids, especially oleic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid and linoleic acid. Also contains terpenes called meliacins which are bitter tasting and have strong antimarial action equal to that of quinine. Limonoids found in Andiroba have anti-inflammatory, insect repellant and anticancerous activity.

Cayaponia tayuya; ficcifolia (Cucurbitaceae) (Tayuya) – This woody vine native to the Amazon rainforest has long tuberous roots that are used in native medicine as an analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety and nervine, adaptogen, blood cleanser and antioxidant substance. About 24 novel cucurbitacins known as cayaponosides have been identified as having biological activity. Other alkaloids are also present.

Cecropia mexicana; palmata; peltata; obtusifolia (Cecropiaceae) (Chancarro; Embauba) – Cecropia mexicana leaves have sometimes been used as a substitute for marijuana. Other species of Cecropia tree native to South America and the West Indies have their leaves used medicinally for their antispasmodic, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-asthmatic, antioxidant, antimicrobial and central nervous system depressant effects. Bark of Cecropia species is burned to a fine white ash which is used to potentiate the alkaloids in Coca as well as Virola and Anadenanthera snuffs.

Cimicifuga racemosa (Ranunculaceae) (Black Cohosh) – This North American woodland plant has estrogenic, hypoglycemic, sedative, analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions. The root is the strongest portion of the plant. Can cause symptoms of poisoning and is thought to be toxic in large amounts. Also listed as having narcotic and hypnotic effects.

Citrus species (Rutaceae) – Essential oils of  several species of citrus have euphoric, stimulant, antidepressant and analgesic effects. Also highly antimicrobial. Limonene and other common plant scents make up the essential oil content. The stimulant B-phenethylamine alkaloid synephrine and related compounds have been isolated from several Citrus species.
Citrus aurantifolia (Lime) – stimulant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory
Citrus aurantium (Neroli) – euphoriant, analgesic, sedative and narcotic
Citrus bergamia (Bergamot) – euphoriant and stimulant, antidepressant
Citrus limon (Lemon) – stimulant, euphoriant
Citrus paradisi (Grapefruit) – euphoriant and stimulant, antidepressant
Citrus reticulata (Mandarin) – euphoriant and aphrodisiac
Citrus sinensis (Orange) – euphoriant, stimulant and relaxing.

Clerodendrum serratum (Verbenaceae) – This herb in the Verbena family was shown to possess significant analgesic activity in mice. Clerodenrum trichotomum is listed as a sedative.

Copaifera officinalis; langsdorfii; reticulata (Fabaceae) (Copaiba) – Copaiba trees are native to tropical regions of South America, and the sap (oleoresin) is collected in a manner similar to collecting maple syrup. The resin is used, generally topically, as an analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and anticancerous substance. The resin contains 15% volatile essential oils, mainly sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and terpenic acid. Copaiba resin is the highest known source of the sesquiterpene caryophyllene which has anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect. Many other common and uncommon essential oils are present in the resin.

Cymbopogon species (Poaceae) (Lemongrass) – Lemongrass is a genus of aromatic lemon-scented tropical grasses  that are rich in volatile oils, particulary myrcene, and are used for both culinary and medicinal purposes.. Myrcene has been shown to have potent analgesic and relaxant effects. Lemongrass is also used as a tranquilizing, calming agent. Cymbopogon citratus is most commonly used, and contains the chemicals 1,8-cineole, alpha-pinene, alpha-terpineol, citral, citronellal, citronellol, dipentene, farnesol, geraniol, geranyl-acetate, isovaleric-acid, linalyl-acetate, nerol, querctin, rutin and selenium in addition to myrcene and others. Other species of Cymbopogon that are used for culinary or medicinal purposes are C. jwarancusa, C. martini, C. nardus and C. schoenanthus.

Cypripedium species (Orchidaceae) (Ladyslipper orchid) – This genus of North American slipper orchids contain a variety of volatile compounds, especially derivatives of phenanthrane and orchinol, in their slow growing, fibrous roots. Ladyslipper was once known as “American Valerian” because of its use by pioneers as a tranquilizer and sedative when European valerian was not available. In addition to strong sedative effects, Ladyslipper has been cited as having analgesic and hypnotic effects and causing “giddyness, headache and hallucinations” in high doses. Active species include Cypripedium acaule and C. calceolus.

Dicentra species (Bleeding Heart) (Papaveraceae) – Bleeding heart species are native to temperate regions of both Asia and North America, and have delicately cut foliage and pink or white flowers resembling a heart in shape. All parts of the plant contain a variety of benzoisoquinoline alkaloids. All species are generally considered toxic, and have sometimes been used medicinally for their sedative, analgesic and narcotic effects. Dicentra species have been known to cause livestock poisonings.

Drosera rotundifolia
(Droseraceae) (Sundew) – Sundews are a semi-aquatic bog plant that supplements their mineral-poor diet by catching insects with their long sticky trichomes (plant hairs). Sundew was traditionally used is European herbal medicine as an antitussive, analgesic and antispasmodic.

Erythrina species (Leguminosae/Papilionaceae) (Mulungu; Coral tree) – This genus of approximately 100 species contains both trees and shrubs with brilliantly coloured red-orange flowers native to tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The bark and roots of several species of Erythrina are traditionally used in the Amazon as sedative, hypnotic and narcotic agents, as well as being antibacterial. 78 of 107 species of Erythrina have been found to contain isoquinoline alkaloids, with 20 alkaloids being isolated from E. mulungu alone. Erthrina also has analgesic effects, reduces blood pressure and regulates heartbeat. The species Erythrina americana has been used as a hallucinogen and may be toxic. Erythrina crista-galli is a medium sized tree native to northen Brazil  that produces black seed pods containing red and black seeds that are used to make necklaces and jewelry. Erythrina crista-galli has been used medicinally as a sedative, hypnotic and narcotic and contains beta-erthroidine, erysopine, erysothipine, erysothivine and erysovine. Some species of Erythrina are also used as insecticides and fish poisons. Erythrina acanthocarpa, E. crista-galli, E. herbacea, E. humeana and E. zeyheri are all listed as having narcotic effects.

Filipendula ulmaria
(Rosaceae) (Meadowsweet) – This perennial plant native to Europe was the first plant in which salicyclic acid was reported, in 1835, and it was as a substitute for this plant that the common drug aspirin was first developed. Used in European herbal medicine as an analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and hypotensive. Also has antioxidant effects due to the high tannin content.

Galium odoratum (Rubiaceae) (Sweet Woodruff) – Aromatic leaves are used as additives to certain alcoholic bevarages and as a spice. Listed medicinally as having analgesic, sedative, nervine and narcotic effects.

Gaultheria procumbens (Ericaceae) (Wintergreen) – This creeping perennial plant with bright red berries contains a volatile essential oil that is 98% salicyclic acid and is used as a flavouring in some gums. Salicyclic acid is related to aspirin, and it has analgesic and antipyretic effects. Wintergreen oil is a very effective topical analgesic. Gaultheria frangrantissima is used for similar purposes and is listed as a stimulant.

Hamelia patens (Rubiaceae) (Scarlet Bush) – This bush is native to South America, the West Indies, Central America, Mexico and southern Florida. It is named scarlet bush due to its red-tinged leaves and bright red-orange masses of flowers. The berry is edible and is made into wine in Mexico. Leaves are used in native medicine as an analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antispasmodic and immunostimulant. Rich in alkaloids and flavonoids, including several of the oxindole alkaloids found in Uncaria tomentosa (Cats claw), as well as three novel oxindole alkaloids. The oxindole alkaloids pteropodine and isopteropodine and been shown to have potent immunostimulant properties and a positive modulating effect on serotonergic (5-HT(2)) receptors. The compound rosmarinic acid which has immune modulating and antidepressant activity and the anti-anxiety and sedative compound apigenin have been found in this plant. Also found to contain 0.05% of the stimulant alkaloid ephedrine.

Hibiscus vitifolius (Malvaceae) – Hibiscus is a genus of tropical shrubs with brilliantly coloured large flowers, usually red or yellow in colour. The flavonoid gossypin from yellow-flowered hibiscus has been shown to have analgesic effects similar to morphine, reduces acute tolerance to morphine, and has been shown to effect cholinergic and GABAergic neurotransmitter systems. Red flowered hibiscus is used to prepare a cold tea known as Jamaica punch that is a potent antioxidant. Hibiscus rosa-sinensis (Chinese hibiscus) is listed as an aphrodisiac.

Hyssopus officinalis (Labiatae) (Hyssop) – This aromatic member of the mint family contains a volatile essential oil with numerous components. It is used as a flavouring for alcoholic liqueurs, analgesic, antitussive and treatment for respiratory illnesses and anti-inflammatory. Also listed as a stimulant.

Iresine herbstii (Amaranthaceae) (Cimora Senorita) – Used in the Northern Andes as a divinitory herb, and said to have powerful black magic uses. Sometimes added to San Pedro brews. Also used medicinally as an antipyretic. Tests in mice show analgesic effects as well as reductions in locomotor activity, motor coordination and stereotyped behaviour consistent with the effects of many psychotropic drugs.
Sleep until the Sunlight burns a Happy Whole in your Heart.

Offline Papyrifera

  • Loved by All
  • Uberstrator
  • Ultracontributor
  • Posts: 4608
  • Vis Mediatriz, Yo!
Pain-Killing Ethnobotanicals, J to Z
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2008, 09:58:34 am »
Juniperus species (Cupressaceae) – Juniper species are small to large shrubs, some upright and some creeping in form, widely distributed in temperate regions of the Northern hemisphere. Both  leaves and berries contain several volatile essential oils, and the berries and are sometimes used in cooking as well as being the main flavouring in gin. Juniper oil acts as an antimicrobial, analgesic, stimulant and nervine agent, and has been used for a variety of medicinal purposes, including as a diuretic and smooth muscle contractant. Native Americans smoke the berries in a pipe to treat asthma, to clear head colds, and as an incense and smudging herb. Juniper berries have been found to contain more than 70 volatile essential oils, primarily monoterpenes, including terpinen-4-ol (main constituent), alpha-pinene, alpha-terpineol, borneol, bornyl-acetate, camphor, caryophyllene, citronellal, citronellol, geranyl-acetate, limonene, linalyl-acetate, menthol, myrcene and nerol. Juniper berries also contain catechol tannins, flavonoids and traces of niacin, selenium and thiamine. The leaves of juniper contain citronellol, farnesol, rutin and umbelliferone among other compounds. The wood of juniper contains diterpenes, gallcatechin tannins and lignans and is astringent. Some of the terpenes in juniper essential oil are irritating to the kidneys, and juniper should be taken internally only in small doses. Contraindicted during pregnancy.

Kaempferia galangal (Zingiberaceae) (Galanga) – This member of the ginger family native to New Guinea has an aromatic rhizome containing a number of volatile compounds, from which long, narrow leaves grow. The rhizome is used as a spice and medicine similar to ginger, for its antipyretic, analgesic, antimicrobial, antimalarial, antitussive and stimulant effects. Galanga has sometimes been reported to cause euphoric or hallucinogenic effects when ingested. It also has antioxidant and anticancerous compounds such as kaempferol.

Kalanchoe brasiliensis; pinnata (Crassulaceae) (Kalanchoe) – Of this large genus of succulent plants, K. brasiliensis is the only species occuring in South America, and its leaves are used by natives in the Amazon basin as an antimicrobial, antipyretic, cough supressant, analgesic, muscle relaxant, anti-inflammatory and sedative. Kalanchoe contains many alkaloids, triterpenes, glycosides, flavonoids, and plant steroids. A group of compounds known as bufadienolides isolated from Kalanchoe show structural relations to the cardiac glycosides digoxin and digitoxin from Digitalis species, and may be responsible for some of the effects of this plant.

Larix species (Pinaceae) (Tamarack; Larch) – Larex laricina is a conifer unique for the fact that it is deciduous, its delicate green needles turning yellow and dropping in the fall. A tea made of the inner bark is used in Native American medicine as an antiseptic and as a treatment for depression and heart ailments. The outer bark and roots are boiled to make a dark decoction which is drunk daily as an analgesic to treat arthritis, aches and pains and to cure colds. Larix contains a volatile essential oil rich in bornyl acetate and other terpenoids. Larix decidua is listed as a stimulant.

Lavandula angustifolia (Lamiaceae/Labiatae) (Lavender) – Lavender is a common aromatic herb. It is well known for its strong sedative effects, as well as being antispasmodic, antimicrobial, analgesic, and extremely effective at aiding the healing of cuts and burns. Contains numerous terpenes that are common plant scents, including lavandulin and others. Lavandula angustifolia and L. intermedia are listed as nervine and sedative agents.

Ledum groenlandicum; palustre; glandulosum (Ericaceae) (Labrador tea) – This hardy shrub commonly found in muskeg, bog, and wet coniferous forest areas of Canada, the northern USA and Greenland, has evergreen alternate leaves, with the edges rolled under and covered with rusty hair underneath. White fragrant flowers are produced in terminal clusters. A pleasant tasting tea made of the leaves or flowers is used as a beverage. It is also used medicinally, as a stimulant, a nervine and anxiolytic, analgesic, to treat headaches, and an antimicrobial. A dark coloured decoction made by boiling the plant is often prepared for medicinal uses. Labrador tea contains catechin tannins, flavonoids including quercetin, hyperoside, arbutin, and 0.3-2.5% volatile oil consisting of camphor, palustrol, germacrone, ledol and many other monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. In L. groenlandicum the main volatile oil component is germacrone, whereas in L. palustre the main volatile component is ledol. Labrador tea is thought to be toxic in large amounts, due to the presence of small amounts of the poisonous compound andromedotoxin in Labrador tea leaves. In large doses andromedotoxin can cause harmful effects including headaches, vomitting and death. Although there are no documented deaths from Labrador tea, it should be consumed in dilute infusions only infrequently to minimize this risk.

Leonurus cardiaca; sibiricus (Labiatae) (Siberian Motherwort) – This member of the mint family is used as a mild sedative and hypnotic agent in Siberia and is sometimes used as a substitute for Leonotis species. Motherwort is a perennial that grows up to three feet tall with hairy, segmented leaves up to three inches long, with pink whorls of flowers. Leonurus cardiaca has been used as an analgesic, antispasmodic, anti-asthmatic, nervine, for rabies, as a sedative and as a tonic. Leonotis sibiricus is also listed as having stimulant, hypnotic and sedative effects. Some chemicals contained within the plant include alpha-pinene, benzaldehyde, caryophyllene, limonene, quercetin, quercitrin and rutin. Leonurus japonicus is listed as an aphrodisiac.

Matteuccia struthiopteris (Dryopteridaceae) (Ostrich fern) – This large fern is common to damp woods and river margins in Canada and the northern USA and Eurasia. The base of the green fronds are used medicinally as an analgesic, as a treatment for cancer, to regulate blood sugar, and as an antimicrobial substance. Ostrich fern contains numerous flavonoids, phenylpropanoids and the stilbene pinosylvin. Young fiddle heads are edible.

Maytenus krukovii (Celastraceae) (Chuchuhuasi) – This large canopy tree of the Amazon rainforest has a thick reddish-brown bark that is used by native peoples as an analgesic, aphrodisiac, tonic, stimulant, muscle relaxant and immunostimulant. It is used by shamans and curanderos as a synnergistic plant in many brews. Maytenus contains several different types of sesquiterpene alkaloids as well as triterpenes.

Meconopsis species (Papaveraceae) (Tibetan poppy) – Species of Meconopsis, blue flowered members of the poppy family, have their roots used as an analgesic and sedative in traditional medicine in the Himalayas. The roots contain benzoisoquinoline alkaloids.

Melaleuca species (Myrtaceae) (Tea Tree; Niaouli) – contains a volatile essential oil that is extremely effective against fungi, bacteria, viruses and other microbes. Used as a tea substitute by Captain Cook and his crews, who gave it the name of tea tree. Also an effective analgesic.

Melissa officinalis (Labiatae) (Lemon Balm) – This aromatic perennial member of the mint family native to southern Europe has lemon scented leaves and small white flowers. Melissa is rich in volatile essential oils, which have euphoriant, analgesic, anti-anxiety, antidepressant, sedative, antipyretic and antimicrobial actions. Melissa officinalis has been used as an analgesic, antidepressant, antimicrobial, sedative, antispasmodic and nervine. Some chemicals contained within the plant include caffeic-acid, chlorogenic-acid, eugenyl-acetate, protocatechuic-acid, thymol, ursolic acid, citronellal, citronellol, geraniol, geranyl-acetate, limonene, myrcene, nerol and oleanolic-acid.

Mentha species (Labiatae) (Mint) – Many species of mint contain volatile essential oils. Mentha piperita (peppermint) has potent analgesic activity mediated through kappa opioid receptors, as well as a strong stimulant effect. Many mints have similar activity, and are effective at clearing clogged nasal passageways. Mint is also highly antimicrobial. Contains menthol and other volatile terpenes that are common plant scents. Mentha pulegium (Pennyroyal) is listed as a sedative and can be toxic or poisonous in large amounts due to the presence of terpenes not found in other mint species.

Monarda species (Labiatae) (Bee Balm; Wild Bergamot) – Species of Monarda have brilliant clusters of purple or red flowers. Both leaves and flowers are rich in volatile oils, with spicy and sweet scents. Monarda is an effective antimicrobial agent, and is calming, mildly sedating and analgesic. Monarda fistulosa (wild bergamot) is common in North America, and different varieties have been found to contain an essential oil rich in either geraniol, linalool or thymol. Monarda didyma and M. punctata are also active species and are listed as stimulants.

Morinda citrifolia (Noni) (Rubiaceae) – Fruit, juice, roots and leaves of this Polynesian tree have medicinal effects, although juice of the fruit is most widely available. Has anticancerous and immunostimulant. Other parts of the plant, particularly the roots, have strong analgesic, sedative and hypnotic effects. Found to contain a variety of alkaloids, flavonoids, glycosides and other plant compounds.

Ochna obtusata (Ochnaceae) – Alcoholic extract of bark shows strong analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity.

Petiveria alliacea (Phytolaccaceae) (Anamu) – This herbaceous perennial of the Amazon rainforest, the Caribbean and Africa. The plant is used in Amazonian herbal medicine and it has analgesic, antispasmodic, anti-anxiety, antipyretic, anti-cancer and antimicrobial actions. It also has sedative effects. Many flavonoids, triterpenes, plant steroids and sulfur containing compounds have been isolated from the plant. May also have potential for regulating blood sugar levels, treating arthritis, and as an immunostimulant.

Peumus boldus (Monimiaceae) (Boldo) – This shrubby evergreen is native to Andean regions of Chile and Peru. The leaves are made into a tea which is a general tonic for sickness, antispasmodic, analgesic and effective at settling the stomach and stimulating appetite. Also used as a treatment for altitude sickness. At least seventeen isoquinoline alkaloids have been isolated from boldo, the most biologically active being the alkaloid boldine. Boldo also contains a variety of volatile oils. Listed as a stimulant.

Polemonium caeruleum (Polemoniaceae) (Jacob’s Ladder) – This common aromatic garden plant is used as an analgesic and nervine. Other species of Polemonium are similarly used.

Polygala tenuifolia; senega; sibirica; vulgaris (Polygalaceae) (Chinese Senega) – Polygala tenuifolia is used in Chinese medicine as a treatment for asthma and coughs. Has analgesic, sedative and tranquilizing effects, and is also used as an anti-anxiety, antidepressant and memory enhancer. The related species P. senega (Seneca Snakeroot) is used in native North American medicine as a powerful analgesic and agent to treat bronchial diseases and as a decongestant and stimulant. Seneca snakeroot has been reported to contain up to 12% dry weight of a mixture of triterpene glycosides (senegasaponins A-D), methyl salicyclate and the glucoside of methyl salicyclate. The saponins account for the degongestant effects, and the salicyclates have analgesic and antipyretic effects. Polygala sibirica is listed as a nervine and sedative agent. Polygala vulgaris (Milkwort) is listed as a stimulant. Polygala tenuifolia is reported to contain beta-carboline in the root.

Polygonatum biflorum (Convallariaceae/Lililaceae) (Solomons Seal) – The root of this plant is used in native medicine in North America for many conditions. Includes analgesic and sedative effects among other medicinal effects. May be toxic. Polygonatum humile, P. inflatum, P. macropodum, P. odoratum and P. multiflorum are also listed as sedatives. Polygonatum cirrhifolium is listed as a stimulant.

Pongamia pinnata (Fabaceae) – Extracts of root and seed showed strong analgesic effects in mice.

Populus species (Salicaceae) (Poplar) – Inner bark contains salicyclates which exert analgesic and antipyretic effects. Young leaves are enclosed in sticky bracts. The resin from these bracts is known as balsam and is strongly antimicrobial and is placed on wounds to promote healing and as a topical analgesic. Populus tremuloides (trembling aspen) is listed as having nervine and stimulant effects. Populus balsamifera, P. nigra, P. tremula and P. trichocarpa are also active species.

Primula veris; vulgaris (Primulaceae) (European Cowslip) – This common spring-flowering garden plant has been used in European herbal medicine as a sedative, soporific, antispasmodic and analgesic. The flowers are held to be the strongest part of the plant.

Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae) (Guava) – Shade tree from the tropics. Leaves are used in native medicine as a cough suppressant, antimicrobial, analgesic, antioxidant and central nervous system depressant. Domesticated in Peru several thousand years ago. Seeds and fruit are edible. Contains many volatile essential oils, triterpenes, phenols, flavonoids, saponins and tannins.

Ptychopetalum olacoides; uncinatum (Olacaceae) (Muira Puama) – This small tree native to the Amazon rainforest is used in South American herbal medicine as an aphrodisiac, anti-anxiety and nervine, antidepressant, memory enhancer, analgesic, stimulant and antioxidant. The root and bark contain many fatty acids and fatty acid esters, numerous essential oils including both isomers of caryophyllene, pinene, linalool, limonene and others, plant sterols, triterpenes including the novel compound lupeol, and an alkaloid known as muirapuamine.

Pyrola asarifolia; secunda (Pyrolaceae) (Pink Wintergreen) – This perennial herb with shiny round leaves in a basal rosette and a slender column of pink (P. asarifolia) or greenish-white (P. secunda) flowers on a single flowering stalk is native to moist to circumboreal regions of moist forest. A number of flavonoid glycosides have been isolated from Pyrola leaves, as well as naphthoquinones (such as chimaphilin), sesquiterpenes, arbutin and ursolic acid. Extracts of Pyrola are reported to have analgesic, anti-inflammatory and circulation enhancing activities.

Rosmarinus species (Labiatae) (Rosemary) – Contains a volatile mixture of essential oils witfh potent stimulant, analgesic and antimicrobial action. Rosemary oil is toxic in large doses. Rosmarinus officinalis (true rosemary) is also listed as having nervine effects.

Sarracenia species (Sarraceniaceae) (Pitcher Plant) – Pitcher plants are bog plants native to Canada, the Eastern USA and California, with distinctive hollow pitcher-shaped leaves with purple veins and hoodlike tops. Water sits in the bottom of this pitcher, and insects get trapped in the pitcher, drown and are digested by the plant to meet its demand for nitrogen and other nutrients. The leaves of pitcher plant are used medicinally in Native American medicine as an antitussive, analgesic, antipyretic, antispasmodic and hormone balancing agent. Leaves are reported to contain numerous flavonoids including quercetin, rhamnetin and hyperoside, as well as benzenoids, the triterpenes betulin, amyrins and luteol, and alkaloids. Some species have been shown to have anti-leukemic effects.

Sida acuta/cordifolia (Malvaceae) – Contains ephedrine and related isomers of ephedrine with stimulant, decongestant, analgesic and smooth muscle relaxant properties. Sida rhombifolia has been shown to mediate release of histamine, serotonin (5HT) and other compounds. Sida cordifolia has also been reported to contain the alkaloid N-methyl-l-tryptophan methyl ester, which is also found in several legumes and in the myristicaceous Osteophloem platyspermum, and is related to psychoactive tryptamines in structure.

Sideritis taurica/spp (Lamiaceae) – The genus Sideritis consists of about 140 species native to areas of the Mediterranean. Several species have been reported to contain diterpenes, sesquiterpenes, volatile essential oils and flavonoids. Sideritis species have been used medicinally for their anti-inflammatory, anti-ulcer, antioxidant, anticataract, antimicrobial and immunomodulating effects. Sideritis taurica was analyzed and found to contain fatty acids, hydrocarbons, alpha-amyrin, stigmasterol and beta-sitosterol and derivates of apigenin and isoscutellarein, and showed analgesic, anti-inflammatory and other medicinal effects.

Silphium perfoliatum (Compositae) (Cup Plant) – This native to regions of North America oozes a resinous sap when its stems are snapped. When dried, this sap tuns into a sticky gum. Native peoples chewed this cup and also burned and inhaled the smoke of the rhizome for its analgesic, stimulant, antispasmodic and adaptogen effects. Held to have supernatural powers and used by the Winnebago indians as a cleansing and purifying agent before going on a hunt.

Stachytarpheta hamaicensis; cayennensis (Verbenaceae) (Gervao) – This weedy tropical annual in the verbena family. It is used as an antihistamine, cough suppressant, analgesic, antispasmodic, antipyretic and sedative. The plant contains a variet of flavonoids, terpenes, phenols and steroids. The glycoside verbascoside is an antioxidant, antimicrobial, neuroprotective and antitumorous substance. The flavonoid scutellarein has anti-inflammatory effects. Hispiduline, salicyclic acid and dopamine are also present.

Tynanthus panurensis (Bignoniaceae) (Clavo Huasca) – This large woody vine native to tropical regions of South America has bark and roots with a clove-like scent. It is used
in native medicine as an aphrodisiac, analgesic and to stimulate digestion. It is commonly added to ayahuasca mixtures to settle the stomach. Clavo huasca has been found to contain alkaloids including a unique alkaloid tinantina, tannins, and essential oils including eugenol.

Uncaria tomentosa; guianensis (Rubiaceae) (Cat’s Claw) – This woody vine native to South and Central America is used in native herbal medicine for its immunostimulant, anti-cancerous, antioxidant, adaptogen, analgesic, antimicrobial and antidepressant actions. Oxindole alkaloids isolated from cat’s claw have documented immunostimulant and anti-leukemic properties, and have been shown to have a positive modulating effect of 5-HT (serotonin) receptors. A range of other chemicals, including anti-inflammatory and antiviral quinovic acid glycosides, antioxidant tannins, plant sterols, and immunostimulant carboxyl alkyl esters have been isolated. The tricyclic indole hallucinogen, sedative and MAOI harman is also found in cats claw in small amounts. Other species of Uncaria have been used in traditional Asian medicine and have been found to contain many of the same compounds, particularly the oxindole and beta-carboline alkaloids.

Vernonia lasiopus; galamensis; spp (Sahadevi) (Asteraceae/Compositae) – Species of the genus Vernonia have been shown to have sedative effects in rats, and also to have strong analgesic effects not mediated through opioid receptors.

Viburnum species (Caprifoliaceae) (Cranberry; Crampbark) – Bark of Viburnum species is sometimes referred to as crampbark due to its uses as an analgesic and antispasmodic. Viburnum bark has also been smoked by Native americans as a Tobacco substitute. Viburnum prunifolium, which is listed as a nervine and sedative, has been reported to contain the biflavone amentoflavone, several triterpenes, coumarins, salicin and derivatives of salicin and tannins. Viburnum opulus is listed as a sedative. Viburnum mullaha is listed as a stimulant.

Zizyphus jujuba; spinosa (Chinese Jujube) (Rhamnaceae) – The seeds of the bush Zizyphus spinosa are used in Chinese medicine to calm the mind, treat insomnia and irritability, and as an anti-anxiety herb. Used medicinally for its tranquilizing, hypnotic, analgesic and antispasmodic effects. The related species Ziziphus jujuba is listed as having narcotic and hypnotic effects. Zizyphus species are reported to contain isoquinoline alkaloids.

Love
Sleep until the Sunlight burns a Happy Whole in your Heart.

Offline no one of importance

  • Super Contributor
  • Posts: 432
  • i'd like to wake up now.
Re: Pain-Killing Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2008, 10:02:36 am »
and frankly the most pain killing effects ive ever had from a plant came from psilocybe mushrooms. I was tripping hard and literally dug a giant splinter in my foot out with my fingernails. grotesque shit, actually digging into my foot...I didnt feel a fuckin thing

once while on mimosa/rue anahuasca i tried to introduce my cat to a dog that was visiting.  in her ferver to escape she cut me to ribbons.  didn't feel a thing.
"out of the frying pan and into the stomach"

Offline Mimos

  • Adoxographic
  • Uberator
  • Ultracontributor
  • Posts: 5295
Re: Pain-Killing Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2008, 10:21:13 am »
corydalis spp.

Corydalis has always interested me even since reading an obscure report that one of the alkaloids in C. Cava was supposedly 40% as effective as morphine. I don't remember which one, but I think they referenced corydaline.


However:
Link to Herbalgram Article, Excerpt Below
Corydalis tuber contains a total of 6% alkaloids. The primary one is bulbocapnine, comprising from 20 to 35% of the total alkaloid content. Bulbocapnine is believed to work with the dopaminergic neuronal transmitter system. In vitro studies with rats have confirmed the sedative effect of corydalis. Tetrahydropalmatine, an alkaloid with analgesic, sedative, and tranquilizing effects found in the Chinese species C. yanhuso, does not appear on the extensive list of alkaloids present in C. cava.


Tetrahydropalmatine is an alkaloid found in several different plant species, mainly in the Corydalis family, but also in other plants such as Stephania rotunda. ... The pharmaceutical industry has synthetically produced the more potent enantiomer Levo-tetrahydropalmatine (Levo-THP), which has been marketed worldwide under different brand names as an alternative to anxiolytic and sedative drugs of the benzodiazepine group and analgesics such as opiates.

Tetrahydropalmatine has been demonstrated to possess analgesic effects... It has also shown useful effects in the treatment of drug addiction to both cocaine and opiates, and preliminary human studies have shown promising results.

Animal experiments have shown that the sedative effect of THP results from blocking dopaminergic neurons in the brain. Dopamine is one of the most important neurotransmitters in the central nervous system where it occurs in several important systems that regulate muscular activity and attention, as well as feelings of joy, enthusiasm and creativity. Therefore, THP causes no feelings of euphoria, and has been seen as an alternative to addictive drugs for people suffering from anxiety and pain, and as a possibility for relief for people not helped by existing drugs.

Bulbocapnine is an alkaloid found in Corydalis and Dicentra, herbs in the family Fumariaceae that can cause fatal poisoning in sheep and cattle. It has been shown to act as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, and inhibits biosynthesis of dopamine via inhibition of the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase.

According to the Dorlands Medical Dictionary, it "inhibits the reflex and motor activities of striated muscle. It has been used in the treatment of muscular tremors and vestibular nystagmus". The psychiatrist Robert Heath carried out experiments on prisoners at the Louisiana State Penitentiary using bulbocapnine to induce stupor.

The author William Burroughs references the drug in his book Naked Lunch, where the fictional Dr. Benway uses it to induce obedience in torture victims.

Bulbocapnine Molecule

Looks like it almost shares some structural similarity with the morphinan-type alkaloids. I think that's why people get excited over corydalis, even though the sedating alkaloid in corydalis looks nothing like bulbocapnine.



Link to Henriettesherbal Article, Excerpt Below
Chemical Composition.—The only analysis we find on record of this species of Corydalis (C. formosa, Pursh), is that of Mr. William T. Wenzell (Amer. Jour. Pharm., 1855, Vol. 27, p. 207), who found the root to contain corydaline, fumaric acid, yellow bitter extractive, acrid resin soluble in alcohol or ether, containing volatile oil, tasteless resin, soluble in alcohol and insoluble in ether, brown coloring matter, starch, albumen, bassorin, cellulose and cortical substance, and inorganic salts. The alkaloid corydaline occurs in several species of Corydalis, covered in 1826, by Wackenroder, in the root of Corydalis cava, Schwgg. (C. tuberosa, De Candolle). It crystallizes in white prisms or fine needles, which melt at 135° C. (275° F.). It is odorless and tasteless in substance, but its alcoholic solution or the solutions of its salts are bitter. It is not soluble in water, soluble with difficulty in alcohol, soluble in ether, chloroform, amyl alcohol, carbon disulphide, benzol, and turpentine. Its solution in alcohol has a strongly alkaline reaction. The formula for corydaline has been variously stated by different authors as C18H19NO4 (Wicke), and C22H29NO4 (Dobbie and Lauder, Jour. Chem. Soc., 1892). Adermann's corydaline (Amer. Jour. Pharm., 1890, p. 396) (C22H21NO4), is probably not identical with the body long known by that name. The alkaloids of Corydalis cava have been investigated more closely than the others. E. Merck (Archiv. der Pharm., 1893, p. 131), reports the occurrence of the following: Bulbocapnine, crystallizable, was present in largest quantity; fuses at 199° C. (390.2° F.); corydine, an amorphous alkaloid; corydaline, the alkaloid of Dobbie and Lauder, fusing at 185° C. (275° F.), and a base melting at 218° C. (424° F.). The last alkaloid is probably not identical with Freund and Josephy's corycavine, isolated in 1893, together with bulbocapnine, from commercial corydaline. For Adermann's investigations, see Amer. Jour. Pharm., 1890, p. 396. The preparation sold under the name CORYDALIN, as an old Eclectic concentration, is a mixture of corydalis constituents. It has a dark yellowish-brown color, and not being a definite, proximate principle, should not be confused with the alkaloids.




Offline Teotzlcoatl

  • Kie Ti' Koal
  • Forum Spammer
  • Posts: 717
    • Join the Peyote Way Church!
Re: Pain-Killing Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2008, 05:20:58 pm »
Wow... that's alot of plants!

Are all of those effective? or did you just list them?
WARNING: DO NOT INGEST ANY BOTANICAL WHICH YOU HAVE NOT FULLY RESEARCHED AND CORRECTLY IDENTIFIED!!!


 Teotzlcoatl and all of her incarnations and their activities are projections of a conscious being's intent trasmitted into a pseudo-physical form in between this realm and the next. All posts are fictional, and so is everything esle.


"We Are The One's We've Been Waiting For" - Hopi Proverb

Offline Papyrifera

  • Loved by All
  • Uberstrator
  • Ultracontributor
  • Posts: 4608
  • Vis Mediatriz, Yo!
Re: Pain-Killing Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #9 on: September 23, 2008, 05:57:07 pm »
Are all of those effective? or did you just list them?
Many of them I have never tried, so I can't say for sure. The information was mostly drawn from reputable herbals, so I am confident they have the effects described.
Sleep until the Sunlight burns a Happy Whole in your Heart.

Offline DrYRHead

  • Uberator
  • Ultimate Contributor
  • Posts: 9526
  • Sally as the cave
    • http://www.elfstarstudios.com/rabbit-hole.html
Re: Pain-Killing Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #10 on: September 23, 2008, 10:17:15 pm »
Papaver somniferum.

the little demons...

cannabis is a wonderful painkiller too, but it doesn't bring that comfortable state of mind that opioid receptor agonists do. :)



One recalls something long, long ago about the 2 going very well together though.  :wink: Some sort of synergy involved.
DrYRHead

Welcome to the rabbit hole.

Offline DayLight

  • Super Contributor
  • Posts: 293
  • shes a drug addict aged five
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #11 on: September 26, 2008, 04:25:29 pm »
hahahaha papy i knew you were gonna bust that shit out...man i love it when you do that.

ive tried corydalis yanhuso and it was never the greatest...went well with my narcotic herb combos...but alone was unremarkable.
Then we rested in a desert
Where the bones were white as teeth sir
And we saw st elmo's fire
Splitting ions in the ether                                                                                                                                                      -Brian Eno

Offline Papyrifera

  • Loved by All
  • Uberstrator
  • Ultracontributor
  • Posts: 4608
  • Vis Mediatriz, Yo!
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #12 on: September 27, 2008, 09:44:50 am »
At your service, DayLight  :-D
Sleep until the Sunlight burns a Happy Whole in your Heart.

Offline Teotzlcoatl

  • Kie Ti' Koal
  • Forum Spammer
  • Posts: 717
    • Join the Peyote Way Church!
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #13 on: November 14, 2008, 03:15:21 pm »
Anybody got any other good ones?
WARNING: DO NOT INGEST ANY BOTANICAL WHICH YOU HAVE NOT FULLY RESEARCHED AND CORRECTLY IDENTIFIED!!!


 Teotzlcoatl and all of her incarnations and their activities are projections of a conscious being's intent trasmitted into a pseudo-physical form in between this realm and the next. All posts are fictional, and so is everything esle.


"We Are The One's We've Been Waiting For" - Hopi Proverb

Offline psilocyborg

  • feeling machine
  • Uberator
  • Penultimate Contributor
  • Posts: 7323
  • state of the heart
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #14 on: November 14, 2008, 03:42:19 pm »
I was poking around the internet, lightly researching ayurvedic medicine, and stumbled upon Terminalia arjuna.  It's one among hundreds if not thousands of plants used in Asian folk medicine.  As a general recommendation, I suggest researching both Chinese herbology and Indian ayurveda.  I'm not saying it's all true or useful, but there's undoubtedly a lot of untapped (by western medicine's standards) knowledge in both systems of thought.

Offline boomer2

  • God of the Mycosphere
  • Forum Spammer
  • Posts: 889
  • mycophile
    • http://mushroomjohn.com
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2008, 01:04:05 am »



"Kratom" ~ Mitragyna speciosa

In Thailand, Kratom is not used as a pain killer.  It is used mosly by Thai males for stamina to be chewed to make it though a long days work. 

much in the same way women chew betel nut (used by one tenth of the world's population).

In Malaysia it is used in drug treatment programs for opium addiction as it is less addicting then methadone and has a higher success rate in the treatment of addicts addicted to opiates.

While some kratom is grown in Maylasia, it is illegal as heroin or opium to possess or sell.

It is also illegal in Thailand where one can get a stiffer sentence for kratom than for opiates.
It is also illegal in Australia.

There is an article at my site on kratom in the articles section under Magazines.

boomer2
Have a shroomy day and may all of yor days be shroomy

Offline Papyrifera

  • Loved by All
  • Uberstrator
  • Ultracontributor
  • Posts: 4608
  • Vis Mediatriz, Yo!
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #16 on: November 16, 2008, 09:06:16 am »
For an analgesic effect, you need quite a high dose of kratom.
Sleep until the Sunlight burns a Happy Whole in your Heart.

Offline Teotzlcoatl

  • Kie Ti' Koal
  • Forum Spammer
  • Posts: 717
    • Join the Peyote Way Church!
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #17 on: November 16, 2008, 04:20:46 pm »
Really? Just kinda fucks you up at low doses?

I thought it was supposed to be really effective.
WARNING: DO NOT INGEST ANY BOTANICAL WHICH YOU HAVE NOT FULLY RESEARCHED AND CORRECTLY IDENTIFIED!!!


 Teotzlcoatl and all of her incarnations and their activities are projections of a conscious being's intent trasmitted into a pseudo-physical form in between this realm and the next. All posts are fictional, and so is everything esle.


"We Are The One's We've Been Waiting For" - Hopi Proverb

Offline Papyrifera

  • Loved by All
  • Uberstrator
  • Ultracontributor
  • Posts: 4608
  • Vis Mediatriz, Yo!
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #18 on: November 16, 2008, 06:43:36 pm »
In my experience, the psychoactive effects become noticeable at 3-5 grams, whereas the analgesic effects take more like 10 grams. It is still effective as a painkiller, just at that dosage level it is pretty strongly psychoactive also. Sensitive individuals may also experience nausea at this dosage. I dosed a friend when he threw out his knee, and at 10 grams was effective as a pain killer but he said his thought processes were disjointed, and it was difficult to think clearly. Very dopey at higher dosages.
Sleep until the Sunlight burns a Happy Whole in your Heart.

Offline DrYRHead

  • Uberator
  • Ultimate Contributor
  • Posts: 9526
  • Sally as the cave
    • http://www.elfstarstudios.com/rabbit-hole.html
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #19 on: November 16, 2008, 07:45:54 pm »
Kratom synergizes well with other stuff too. Such that the dosage can be reduced and the medicinal effects increased. For example, Kratom mixed with sedatives like wild dagga, skullcap herb, Valerian root, kava kava root, and even catnip herb can increase the analgesic potential of the kratom.

When kratom is mixed with stimulant herbs like Ephedra and Sida the stimulant and decongestant potential are synergized and increase. Kratom, also, seems to have some anti-tussive effects. Such that it mixes well into an herbal cold remedy.  :wink:

DrYRHead

Welcome to the rabbit hole.

Offline Papyrifera

  • Loved by All
  • Uberstrator
  • Ultracontributor
  • Posts: 4608
  • Vis Mediatriz, Yo!
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #20 on: November 18, 2008, 01:00:47 pm »
DrY is right; I'd point out blue lotus as a good analgesic herb with which to mix kratom.
Sleep until the Sunlight burns a Happy Whole in your Heart.

Offline boomer2

  • God of the Mycosphere
  • Forum Spammer
  • Posts: 889
  • mycophile
    • http://mushroomjohn.com
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #21 on: December 09, 2008, 06:52:20 pm »
Common Cold (General Illness) Daytime/Nighttime

Epedra (Daytime)
Coca (Daytime)

Pain-Killers

"Kratom" ~ Mitragyna speciosa

Botanicals only please.

In Thailand, Kratom ios only used for Stamina, to be able to work through a 12-16 hour a day life style.

In Malaysia, where it is highly illegal, as it is in Thailand and Australia, it is used in the treatment of opium addiction rather than methadone which the Malaysians consider to be more addicting than opium and/or  heroin and in Thailand you get more time for Kratom leaves then you do for opium//

You can read my magazine article about Kratom at this URL.
Kraton: the Energetic Thai Opiate by john W.Allen and Muraco, Ph.D.

http://mushroomjohn.org/mags1.htm

I have dozens of photos of the flowers, seeds pods, leaves and trees as high as forty feet and taller.

It is not used for pain in Thailand at all.

Another western excuse to do a drug/plant because it is believed to relieve pain. It helps a worker get through the long hours of a day that they work.

I South Asian and SE Asia, as well as all of Indonesia and Polynesia, Woman chew Betel Nut for the same reason.  Stamia.  In fact statistics show that one-tenth of the world's population chew betel.

Others use Kava and some societies still use ephedra as a stimulant.

Have you ever seen the photo of Pope John drinking Kava while he was in Fiji.

Very famous photo which hurts the new pope who said that anyone doing a drug is committing a mortal sin.  Remember he recently made seven more desires into  mortal sins.

Yet child molestation and rape are not in his doctrine, nor did the supposed creator (the one everyone calls God or Allah) write those into their laws or onto the tablet Moses referred to as The Ten Commandments, supposedly written in fire by the finger and hand of God.  And neither did Hammurabi have those last two illnesses in his book of laws written in 2500 B.C.

But in Thailand where Kratom is used daily by low income peoples, it is used to strengthen their day as is coca in Peru and Ecuador.

Of course the pope drinks alcohol (Wine ) and who knows what else, maybe little boys?

boomer2
Have a shroomy day and may all of yor days be shroomy

Offline 3lbs

  • Forum Spammer
  • Posts: 634
  • this text is personal.
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #22 on: December 09, 2008, 07:19:28 pm »
nice article boomer, thx
You can't protect people from themselves, but you can certainly make life not worth living by removing people's right to do what they will. -mis

Offline Teotzlcoatl

  • Kie Ti' Koal
  • Forum Spammer
  • Posts: 717
    • Join the Peyote Way Church!
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #23 on: December 09, 2008, 09:10:01 pm »
Great post, thanks Boomer!
WARNING: DO NOT INGEST ANY BOTANICAL WHICH YOU HAVE NOT FULLY RESEARCHED AND CORRECTLY IDENTIFIED!!!


 Teotzlcoatl and all of her incarnations and their activities are projections of a conscious being's intent trasmitted into a pseudo-physical form in between this realm and the next. All posts are fictional, and so is everything esle.


"We Are The One's We've Been Waiting For" - Hopi Proverb

Offline Noman

  • Tolerated
  • Ultracontributor
  • Posts: 5793
  • DCLXVI
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #24 on: December 12, 2008, 12:48:05 pm »
All posts following the above have been split off into their own topic titled "ST1R and Boomer's Drama" and moved to the forum The Lycaeum Web Site because they had nothing to do with visionary plants and I'm sick of it.
That there's some good in the world, Mr. Frodo, and it's worth fighting for. - Samwise Gamgee

Offline Teotzlcoatl

  • Kie Ti' Koal
  • Forum Spammer
  • Posts: 717
    • Join the Peyote Way Church!
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2008, 04:51:41 pm »
Thank you so much Noman!
WARNING: DO NOT INGEST ANY BOTANICAL WHICH YOU HAVE NOT FULLY RESEARCHED AND CORRECTLY IDENTIFIED!!!


 Teotzlcoatl and all of her incarnations and their activities are projections of a conscious being's intent trasmitted into a pseudo-physical form in between this realm and the next. All posts are fictional, and so is everything esle.


"We Are The One's We've Been Waiting For" - Hopi Proverb

Offline Teotzlcoatl

  • Kie Ti' Koal
  • Forum Spammer
  • Posts: 717
    • Join the Peyote Way Church!
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #26 on: February 02, 2009, 05:03:20 pm »
*updated*

Check out the updated first post!
WARNING: DO NOT INGEST ANY BOTANICAL WHICH YOU HAVE NOT FULLY RESEARCHED AND CORRECTLY IDENTIFIED!!!


 Teotzlcoatl and all of her incarnations and their activities are projections of a conscious being's intent trasmitted into a pseudo-physical form in between this realm and the next. All posts are fictional, and so is everything esle.


"We Are The One's We've Been Waiting For" - Hopi Proverb

Offline ST1R

  • Doing my best having been sentenced to life. ..on Earth.
  • Uberstrator
  • Transcendent
  • Posts: 14445
  • Sum Fumo. Sum Illuminate. Suma Psychonauti
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #27 on: February 02, 2009, 05:09:13 pm »
Not "visionary",
moving to other.
"Chemistry is pornography in disguise, you just have to know which functional group to look at."
A. Shulgin
"If we knew what we were doing, it wouldn't be called research."
A. Einstein
"Have you never seen anybody that knows not much? Does your grandma make lsd for you in christmas?"
A. ..?

Offline Teotzlcoatl

  • Kie Ti' Koal
  • Forum Spammer
  • Posts: 717
    • Join the Peyote Way Church!
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #28 on: February 27, 2009, 02:04:46 pm »
Analgesic Ethnobotanicals-

"Kratom" ~ Mitragyna speciosa (Bali best strain for pain-killing?)

"Myrrh" ~ Commiphora myrrha

"Yellow Hornpoppy" ~ Glaucium flavum

"Blackseed" ~ Nigella sativa

"Dan Shen" ~ Salvia miltiorrhiza

"Neem" ~ Azadirachta indica

"Mulungu" ~ Erythrina mulungu

"Lousewort" ~ Pedicularis species

"Salvia" ~ Salvia nemorosa (????) ???) please tell me more aobut these salvias

"Salvia" ~ Salvia spathacea (???) please tell me more aobut these salvias

"Salvia" ~ Salvia transsylvanica ???) please tell me more aobut these salvias

Yan Hu Suo" ~ Corydalis turtschaninovii and other speices

"White Willow" ~ Salix alba

"Blue Lily" ~ Nymphaea caerulea

Nelumbo nucifera

red poppy and other poppies

Imphepho

Chaste tree berries

various "other" papaveraceae

Picrilima nitida

Red clover (trifolium pratense)

rhodiola rosea alkaloid (rosavin)

Alaskan opiate bush (rhododendron tomentosum)

Boswellia ~  Frankinsense







To potentiate the effects-

Chile pepper" ~ Capsicum species

"Black pepper" ~ Piper nigrum










Analgesic Pill?

"Kratom" ~ Mitragyna speciosa (Bali best strain for pain-killing?)

"Myrrh" ~ Commiphora myrrha

"Yellow Hornpoppy" ~ Glaucium flavum

"Blackseed" ~ Nigella sativa

"Dan Shen" ~ Salvia miltiorrhiza

"Yan Hu Suo" ~ Corydalis turtschaninovii or Corydalis yanhusuo

"Blue Lily" ~ Nymphaea caerulea

"White Willow" ~ Salix alba

Picrilima nitida


What esle should I add???
WARNING: DO NOT INGEST ANY BOTANICAL WHICH YOU HAVE NOT FULLY RESEARCHED AND CORRECTLY IDENTIFIED!!!


 Teotzlcoatl and all of her incarnations and their activities are projections of a conscious being's intent trasmitted into a pseudo-physical form in between this realm and the next. All posts are fictional, and so is everything esle.


"We Are The One's We've Been Waiting For" - Hopi Proverb

Offline psilocyborg

  • feeling machine
  • Uberator
  • Penultimate Contributor
  • Posts: 7323
  • state of the heart
Re: Medinical Ethnobotanicals
« Reply #29 on: March 03, 2009, 11:03:52 am »
Medinical?  For real?  Has nobody else noticed this?  This has been bothering me for months.