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Hallucinogenic Plants of North America
Jonathon Ott

Pages: 162
Price: $50-$120 (Out of Print)
Publisher: Wingbow Press: Berkeley
Pub Date: 1976
ISBN: 914728156

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Table of Contents >
INTRODUCTION by Richard Evans Schultes ix
PREFACE  xi
FOREWORD xv
PART ONE Hallucinogenic Plants of North America 1

Agaricaceae 3
Amanita muscaria 5
Amanita pantherina. 7
Panaeolusfoenisecii 9
Panaeolus sphinctrinus 11
Panaeolussubbalteatus 13
Psilocybebaeocystis 15
Psilocybecaerulescens 17
Psilocybecubensis 19
Psilocybecyanescens 22
Psilocybe pelliculosa 24
Psilocybesemilanceata 26
Psilocybe stuntzll 28
Psilocybe wassonnii 30
Psilocybe yungensis 32
Psilocybe zapotecorum 34

Araceae 37
Acorus calamus 39

Cactaceae 41
Ariocarpus fissuratus 43
Coryphanthamacromeris 45
Lophophorawilliamsii 47

Cannabaceae 49
Cannabis indica 51
Cannabis sativa 53

Convolvulaceae 55
Argyreia nervosa 57
Ipomoea violacea 59
Rivea corymbosa 61

Solanaceae 63
Atropa belladonna 65
Datura discolor 67
Datura innoxia 69
Datura stramonium 71
Nicotiana tabacum 73

Zygophyllaceae 77
Peganum harrnala 78

PART TWO The Etiology of Religion: A History of Hallucinogen Use 81

PART THREE The Biochemistry of Emotion 103

APPENDIX A Chemistry of Hallucinogens and Neurotransmitters 121
APPENDIX B Words 129
APPENDIX C Field and Extraction Techniques for the Amateur 135

AFTERWORD 141
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 145
SUGGESTED READING 147
BIBLIOGRAPHY 149
INDEX 157

 
Description >
From Back Cover:

    As the use of hallucinogenic plants becomes more & more widespread, the controversy concerning their potential dangers and possible benefits becomes less and less rational. New-age utopians defend their psychoactive properties on spiritual & aesthetic grounds, while past-age spokesmen condemn them with moral precepts. Hallucinogenic Plants of North America, in presenting the objective data of current scientific research, is one of the first books to attempt to restore the rationality to this ongoing controversy. This book has been designed both to give the recreational user access to reliable, accurate information on hallucinogenic plants, and to serve as a multi-disciplinary reference source, presenting botanical, chemical, historical, and neuropharmacological data for students and laymen alike. Thirty representative hallucinogenic plants, ranging from the rain forests of Puget Sound to the deserts and tropics of Mexico, are described in botanical, chemical and historical terms. 

 

 
Reviews/Excerpts >

"Of the many manuals in its field, Jonathan Ott's is by far the best for the layman- comprehensive in scope, judicious ill its warnings, packed with information. Discussion of public policy is sensible. Every legislator and judge, Federal and state, would do well to read Ott on Drugs." -  R. Gordon Wasson 

"Hallucinogenic Plants of North America will surely take its place as a book-and there are far too few of them-destined never to be outdated simply because it is built of the stuff that thinking man of any period of time needs if he is to be understanding of the past, sympathetic of the present, and inquisitive of the future." - Richard Evans Schultes 


Introduction:

In many cultures around the world, hallucinogenic plants have long played vital roles in every aspect of living and dying. As a result of their extraordinary effects, they are held to be organisms inhabited by supernatural forces and, consequently, are sacred, sometimes even deified. During the past century, these narcotics have attracted the attention of artistic, literary, and scientific thought in western cultures. In the last three or four decades especially, growing numbers of people in nearly all sectors of our society have experimented with some of the hallucinogens. occasionally, this experimentation has apparently assumed almost epidemic proportions, and our society has become heatedly divided by the recent flirtation with these drug plants from exotic cultures or with active chemical substances derived from them. There seems to be little or no middle ground in the arguments that swirl around the use of hallucinogens in our midst. Into such an environment this book is born. It comes as a fresh breath and with an understanding look at the historical development of hallucinogens in human affairs. Basically an anthology , it employs exquisitely .chosen quotations from a wide spectrum of literature-both ancient and modern-and, often in truly poetic fashion, weaves around the selections the author's searching, sympathetic, meaningful, and, on occasion, even challenging interpretations: It rightly could be described as an anthological commentary on the hallucinogenic scene in human history . The work of a very young man of great promise, Hallucinogenic Plants of North America will surely take its place as a book-and there are far too few of them-destined never to be outdated simply because it is built of the stuff that thinking man of any period of time needs if he is to be understanding of the past, sympathetic of the present, and inquisitive of the future. 

Richard Evans Schultes Professor of Biology Director and Curator of Economic Botany Botanical Museum of Harvard University Cambridge, Massachusetts 

 

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